Cemeteries and graveyards, full of love, betrayal, tragic deaths, murder and suicide. What will you find?...

Tuesday, 31 July 2012

Fanny Brewer



Taphophilia is a passion for and enjoyment of cemeteries. The singular term is a taphophile.


Monument to Fanny Brewer, St James the Less, Stubbings.

"Scared to the memory of Fanny.  Loved and loving wife of Frederick Brewer of Woodlands, Burchetts Green.  Who died Nov 5th 1894 aged 46 years.
And God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes
He giveth his beloved sleep."


Fanny Brewer was born Fanny Hawkins at St George the Martyr, Surrey 1848 to Charles, a clerk in a paper mill and Esther Hawkins.  On 12th January 1876 Fanny married Frederick Brewer, an accountant, and became saddled with a name that would make many of us titter today.  Fanny Brewer.

Fanny and Frederick had no (living) children despite their 18 year marriage.  Fanny passed away in 1894 aged just 46 years.  Throughout their lives together Fanny's sister Jessie Ann lived with them.

Sadly I cannot find what happened to Frederick or Jessie after Fanny's death, as they seem to vanish from the records.



For more Taphophile Tragics, please click here.

20 comments:

  1. surely, in that era, it would not have been proper for Jessie to remain with Frederick after her sister's death?

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    1. I'm not entirely sure. Being that Jessie lived with her sister and was unmarried I believe she may have had a disability of some sort. I did find a Jessie A Hawkins on the 1911 census, but the ages didn't match. Tehy're probably on the records some where but may have been transcribed incorrectly as I have found Fanny and Fred listed as Bremer on earlier records.

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  2. Fanny was 28 when she married, already considered a spinster. I hope she had some happiness in her marriage given she wasn't meant to grow old. Any idea what she died of?

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    1. So do I. In Victorian times spinster just meant and unmarried woman of any age.

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    2. Sorry, I have no idea what she died from, I would have to purchase her death certificate to find out. Probably TB

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  3. Great choice of B&W for the photo. I maxed the photo and really like the fact that the arms of the large cross are not rigidly straight. Lovely carvings, tool

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    1. Thank you, I think it's supposed to looklike a ristic wooden cross.

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  4. Devious brain at work: did Jessie have any children?

    Yes, 'fanny brewer' is an unfortunate combination, of which she may have been oblivious. The cross is reminiscent of the cross that Deb posted aBOUT THE sad orphan buried with others to save money ... or because there was no money.

    Your posts often have an ambience of ghosts inthe graveyard about them. Love it.

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    1. Thank you. Jessie remained unmarried and had no children from what I can find.

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  5. I agree with Julie in the ghostly ambiance of your cemetery photos.

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  6. interesting question hamilton asks!

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  7. It interesting to find out more about the people who are buried, sad when they cannot be found.

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    1. They're probably on the records some where, but you have to rely on the transcribers understanding the handwriting. A lot of people's names are usually spelt incorrectly

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  8. I just love your photos of the monuments. They are such moving works of art.

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    1. Thank you for visiting and commenting. I'm glad you like my pictures.

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  9. Nicola, I just found your blog through GeneaBloggers. What an interesting concept--I love discovering the stories behind these people we stumble upon in our research! Best wishes to you as you continue blogging!

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    1. Thank you for visiting and taking the time to visit. I guess it all started because I ran out of people I could research on my own family tree.

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  10. Welcome to the GeneaBloggers family. Hope you find the association fruitful; I sure do. I have found it most stimulating, especially some of the Daily Themes.

    May you keep sharing your ancestor stories!

    Dr. Bill ;-)
    http://drbilltellsancestorstories.blogspot.com/
    Author of "13 Ways to Tell Your Ancestor Stories" and family saga novels:
    "Back to the Homeplace" and "The Homeplace Revisited"
    http://thehomeplaceseries.blogspot.com/
    http://www.examiner.com/x-53135-Springfield-Genealogy-Examiner
    http://www.examiner.com/x-58285-Ozarks-Cultural-Heritage-Examiner
    http://www.examiner.com/heritage-tourism-in-springfield-mo/dr-bill-william-l-smith
    http://www.squidoo.com/lensmasters/drbilltellsexcitingstories
    The Heritage Tourist at In-Depth Genealogist: http://www.indepthgenealogist.com/

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  11. I just love these old stones.

    Welcome to Geneabloggers.

    Regards, Jim
    Genealogy Blog at Hidden Genealogy Nuggets

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